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Roman Cursive

Cursive forms of the Roman alphabet were used to write Latin by hand between the 1st century BC and about the 7th century AD. The lower case letters of the modern Latin alphabet developed from these cursive letters.

Old Roman Cursive

This cursive version of the Latin alphabet was used from about the 1st century BC to the 3rd century AD. It was the handwritten form of the alphabet. It is also known as majuscule cursive or capitalis cursive. There was variation in how the letters were written.

Old Roman Cursive alphabet

New Roman Cursive

This cursive version of the Latin alphabet was used from about the 3rd and 7th centuries AD, and which developed from Old Roman Cursive.

New Roman Cursive alphabet

Source: http://sites.dartmouth.edu/ancientbooks/2016/05/25/ancient-fonts-rustic-capitals-old-and-new-roman-cursive/

Sample text

Sample text in Old Roman Cursive

This text was written on a wall in Pompey, and dates from the 1st century AD.

Source: http://sites.dartmouth.edu/ancientbooks/2016/05/25/ancient-fonts-rustic-capitals-old-and-new-roman-cursive/

Download charts for Latin alphabets (Excel)

Information about the Roman Cursive scripts
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roman_cursive
http://sites.dartmouth.edu/ancientbooks/2016/05/25/ancient-fonts-rustic-capitals-old-and-new-roman-cursive/

Other versions of the Latin alphabet

Archaic Latin alphabet, Basque-style lettering, Carolingian Minuscule, Classical Latin alphabet, Fraktur, Gaelic script, Merovingian, Modern Latin alphabet, Roman Cursive, Rustic Captials, Old English, Sütterlin, Visigothic Script


If you need to type in many different languages, the Q International Keyboard can help. It enables you to type almost any language that uses the Latin, Cyrillic or Greek alphabets, and is free.

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