Georgian alphabet (Mkhedruli)

languagesoftware.net - which is the best language course or software - compare

Georgian alphabet (Mkhedruli)   Ⴋხედრული

Origin

The Mkhedruli alphabet developed from an older Georgian alphabet known as Nuskhuri between the 11th and 13th centuries. The name Mkhedruli comes from the word mkhedari which means 'of horseman'. The Nuskhuri alphabet developed from the Asomtavruli alphabet.

At first Mkhedruli was used only for secular writing, while for religious writings a mixture of the two older alphabets was used. Eventually Nuskhuri became the main alphabet for religious texts and Asomtavruli was used only for titles and for the first letters of sentences. This system of mixing the two alphabets was known as khucesi (priest) writing.

Eventually the two older alphabets fell out of use and Mkhedruli became the sole alphabet used to write Georgian. However, in the writings of a linguist called Akaki Shanidze (1887-1987) and in works written in his honour, letters from the Asomtavruli alphabet are used to mark proper names and the beginning of sentences. Shanidze's attempt to popularise such usage met with little success.

The first printed material in the Georgian language, a Georgian-Italian dictionary, was published in 1629 in Rome. Since then the alphabet has changed very little, though a few letters were added by Anton I in the 18th century, and 5 letters were dropped in the 1860s when Ilia Chavchavadze introduced a number of reforms.

Notable features

  • Type of writing system: alphabet
  • Direction of writing: left to right, horizontal
  • When printed, Mkhedruli letters are not connected at all, though they can be in cursive handwriting.
  • The headline letters are used for titles and headlines.
  • Georgian has no symbols for numerals. Each letter has a numerical value as well as a phonological one, but Indic numerals (1, 2, 3, etc) are normally used.
  • The order of the Mkhedruli letters is based on that of the Greek alphabet. The Georgian consontants with no Greek equivalents come at the end of the alphabet.

Used to write

Georgian (ქართული ენა), a Kartvelian or South Caucasian language spoken by about 4.1 million people mainly in Georgia (საქართველო), and also in Armenia, Azerbaijan, Iran, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Russia, Tajikistan, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, USA and Uzbekistan

Mingrelian (მარგალური ნინა), a South Caucasian language spoken in north-western Georgia by perhaps half a million people.

Laz (ლაზური ნენა), a South Caucasian language closely related to Mingrelian and spoken in Turkey and Georgia by about 33,000 people.

Svan (ლუშნუ ნინ), a South Caucasian language with about 30,000 speakers mainly in the northwest of Georgia.

Abkhaz (აფხაზური ენა), a Northwest Caucasian language, was also once written with the Mkhedruli alphabet, but is now written with the Cyrillic alphabet.

Georgian Mkhedruli alphabet (მხედრული)

Georgian Mkhedruli alphabet

Notes

  • The letters in red are no longer used.
  • The names of the letters in the Georgian alphabet are the formal, traditional names. The letters names in the IPA are the usual way to refer to them.
  • The letters used to have the numerical values shown.

Georgian pronunciation

Georgian pronunciation

Downloads

Download a Georgian alphabet chart in Word or PDF format

Information about the Georgian alphabet from Konstantin Gugeshashvili

Sample text in Georgian

ყველა
ადამიანი
იბადება
თავისუფალი
და თანასწორი
თავისი
ღირსებითა და
უფლებებით.
მათ
მინიჭებული
აქვთ გონება
და სინდისი და
ერთმანეთის
მიმართ უნდა
იქცეოდნენ
ძმობის
სულისკვეთებით.

Transliteration

Qvela adamiani ibadeba tavisupali da tanasts'ori tavisi ghirsebita da uplebebit. Mat minich'ebuli akvt goneba da sindisi da ertmanetis mimart unda iktseodnen dzmobis sulisk'vetebit.

A recording of this text by George Keretchashvili

Translation

All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. They are endowed with reason and conscience and should act towards one another in a spirit of brotherhood.
(Article 1 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights)

Useful phrases in Georgian | Tower of Babel in Georgian

books   Georgian language learning materials

Links

Information about the Georgian language
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Georgian_language
http://www.aboutgeorgia.net/language/

The Georgian Language - a guide to pronunciation and an outline grammatical description
http://www.armazi.com/georgian/

Online Georgian language course
http://webzone.imer.mah.se/projects/georgianV04/INTRO/

Georgian language Distance Learning Course
http://www.georgian-language.com

Online Georgian dictionaries
http://www.translate.ge
http://www.georgianweb.com/language/dictionary/index.html

Georgian transliteration and spell check
http://ge.translit.cc/
http://www.translitteration.com/transliteration/en/georgian/national/

Free Georgian fonts
http://www.fonts.ge
http://www.wazu.jp/gallery/Fonts_Georgian.html
http://babel.uoregon.edu/yamada/fonts/georgian.html

Online Georgian news and radio
http://www.tavisupleba.org/

South Caucasian languages

Georgian, Laz, Mingrelian, Svan

Alphabets

Armenian, Avestan, Bassa (Vah), Beitha Kukju, Borama / Gadabuursi, Carian, Carpathian Basin Rovas, Chinuk pipa, Coorgi-Cox, Coptic, Cyrillic, Dalecarlian runes, Elbasan, Etruscan, Galik, Georgian (Asomtavruli), Georgian (Nuskhuri), Georgian (Mkhedruli), Glagolitic, Gothic, Greek, Irish (Uncial), Kaddare, Khazarian Rovas, Korean, Latin, Leptonic, Lycian, Lydian, Manchu, Meroïtic, Mongolian, N'Ko, Ogham, Old Church Slavonic, Oirat Clear Script, Old Italic, Old Permic, Orkhon, Phrygian, Pollard script, Runic, Santali, Székely-Hungarian Rovás (Hungarian Runes), Somali (Osmanya), Sutton SignWriting, Tai Lue, Thaana, Todhri, Uyghur


More To Explore