Celtic cognates

Celtic cognates

Adjectives | Conjunctions | Pronouns | Verbs | People | Animals | Birds | Sea creatures | Parts of the body | Colours | Numbers | Time expressions | Musical terms | Trees | Other words

Celtiadur

A collection of Celtic cognates, with definitions, pronunciation, etymologies - includes the modern Celtic languages, older versions of these languages, such as Middle Welsh, Old Irish, and their extinct and reconstructed relatives and ancestors, including Gaulish, Celtiberian, Proto-Brythonic and Proto-Celtic.

Words marked with an asterisk are archaic and/or used only in place names. The Cornish words shown are in the Standard Written Form (Furv Skrifys Savonek) of Cornish. The Breton words are in Peurunvan/Modern Standard Spelling.


Colours

Gaeilge
(Irish)
Gàidhlig
(Gaelic)
Gaelg
(Manx)
Cymraeg
(Welsh)
Kernewek
(Cornish)
Brezhoneg
(Breton)
English
airgead airgead argid arian arghans arc'hant silver
bán bàn bane bân* white
pure
blond
fionn fionn fynn gwyn gwynn gwenn
geal geal gial gell gell gell white
bright
brown
bay
buí buidhe bwee yellow
gold
melyn melyn melen
ór òr airh aur owr aour
corcra corcar porffor purpur pourpré purple
dearg dearg jiarg red
crimson
rua ruadh ruy rhudd* rudh ruz
coch coch
cough
donn donn dhone dwn brown
dun
dubh dubh doo du du du black
glas glas glass glas glas glas blue
green
grey
gwyrdd gwyrdh
gwer
gwer green
gorm gorm gorrym gwrm* gorm
(brown)
uurm*
(dark)
blue
black
liath liath lheeah llwyd loos loued grey

Note

The usual Welsh word for red is coch. It has no cognates in other Celitic languages, and comes from the Latin coccum (a scarlet berry), which is also the root of coccinus (scarlet, scarlet-dyed), from which comes the English word cochineal, and related words in other languages [source].

Celtic cognates

Adjectives | Conjunctions | Pronouns | Verbs | People | Animals | Birds | Sea creatures | Parts of the body | Colours | Numbers | Time expressions | Musical terms | Trees | Other words

Celtiadur

A collection of Celtic cognates, with definitions, pronunciation, etymologies - includes the modern Celtic languages, older versions of these languages, such as Middle Welsh, Old Irish, and their extinct and reconstructed relatives and ancestors, including Gaulish, Celtiberian, Proto-Brythonic and Proto-Celtic.

[top]

If you would like to make any corrections or additions to this page, or if you can provide recordings, please contact me.

Links

Stòr-fhaclan Co-dhàimheil Ceilteach (Database of Celtic cognates)
http://www.smo.uhi.ac.uk/gaidhlig/faclair/scc/lorg.php

McBain's Etymological Dictionary of the Gaelic Language
http://www.ceantar.org/Dicts/MB2/

Information about Celtic languages

Breton, Celtiberian, Cornish, Cumbric, Gaulish, Irish, Lepontic, Lusitanian, Manx, Scottish Gaelic, Tartessian, Welsh


Green Web Hosting - Kualo

Why not share this page:

 

If you need to type in many different languages, the Q International Keyboard can help. It enables you to type almost any language that uses the Latin, Cyrillic or Greek alphabets, and is free.

If you like this site and find it useful, you can support it by making a donation via PayPal or Patreon, or by contributing in other ways. Omniglot is how I make my living.

Note: all links on this site to Amazon.com, Amazon.co.uk and Amazon.fr are affiliate links. This means I earn a commission if you click on any of them and buy something. So by clicking on these links you can help to support this site.