Maguindanao (Magindanawn)

Maguindanao is a member of the Greater Central Philippine branch of the Philippine language family. It is spoken by 1.1 million people, mainly in Maguindanao province in the south of Mindanao island in the Philippines, and also in the provinces of North Cotabato, South Cotabato, Sultan Kudarat, Sarangani, Zamboanga del Sur, Zamboanga Sibugay and Metro Manila.

Maguindanao is also known as Magindanao, Magindanaon, Magindanaw, Maguindanao or Maguindanaw. There are three main dialects: Taw sa ilud, Taw sa laya and Biwangen. It is closely related to Iranun, which is spoken in the same area.

Maguindanao is a statutory language of provincial identity in several provinces in Mindanao.

Written Maguindanao

Maguindanao is written with the Latin alphabet, and used to be written with the Jawi Arabic alphabet. It was first documented by Jacinto Juanmartí, a Catalan priest, in the late 19th century. He translated several religious works in Maguindanao, and published a dictionary and grammar of the language in 1892. A number of other books in and about the language have been published since then.

Maguindanao alphabet and pronunciation

Maguindanao alphabet and pronunciation

Download an alphabet chart for Maguindanao (Excel)

Notes

J and Z are used in loanwords from Arabic.

Sample text

Su laki bu na dala lemawan lun sia sa lekitanu a manga Muslim, ugayd na mamagidsan bun tanan i salam. Apia ngin i salam nengka na egkasabutan nu Kadnan tanan.

Translation

For me, nothing would replace these for us Muslims, but all greetings are the same. Whatever your greetings, all are understood by God.

Source: https://zorc.net/publications/128=MaguindanaonDialogs&Drills%5bsample%5d.pdf

Details provided by Michael Peter Füstumum

Sample videos in and about Maguindanao

Links

Information about Maguindanao
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maguindanao_language
https://www.ethnologue.com/language/mdh
https://quod.lib.umich.edu/
https://zorc.net/publications/
https://books.google.co.uk/
http://sealang.net/maguindanao/

Philippine languages

Abellen, Aborlan Tagbanwa, Aklan, Arta, Balangao, Bantik, Bantoanon, Bikol, Binukid, Bolinao, Bontoc, Botolan, Buhid, Bukid, Butuanon, Calmian Tagbanwa, Caluyanon, Capiznon, Casiguran Dumagat Agta, Cebuano, Central Tagbanwa, Cuyonon, Dupaningan, Gaddang, Gorontalo, Hanuno'o, Hiligaynon, Ibaloi, Ibanag, Ifugao, Ilocano, Iraya, Isnag, Itawis, Kagayanen, Kalanguya, Kankanaey, Kapampangan, Kinabalian, Kinaray-a, Maguindanao, Manide, Maranao, Masbateño, Matigsalug, Mongondow, Palawano, Pangasinan, Rinconada Bikol, Romblomanon, Sambal, Sangirese, Surigaonon, Tagalog, Tagabawà, Tausūg, Tboli, Tombulu, Tondano, Tonsawang, Waray-Waray, Yogad

Languages written with the Latin alphabet

Page created: 17.09.21. Last modified: 22.09.21


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