Koreanclass101.com

Learn Hebrew online

Talk In Arabic

Cyrillic script

The Cyrillic script is named after Saint Cyril, a missionary from Byzantium who, along with his brother, Saint Methodius, created the Glagolitic script. Modern Cyrillic alphabets developed from the Early Cyrillic script, which was developed during the 9th century in the First Bulgarian Empire (AD 681-1018) by a decree of Boris I of Bulgaria (Борис I). It is thought that St. Kliment of Ohrid, a disciple of Cyril and Methodius, was responsible for the script. The Early Cyrillic script was based on the Greek uncial script with ligatures and extra letters from the Glagolitic and Old Church Slavonic scripts for sounds not used in Greek.

Early Cyrillic script

Early Cyrillic script

Notes

Cyrillic numerals

The letters had numeric values, the order of which came from the Greek alphabet.

Cyrillic numerals

Modern Cyrillic script

This chart shows most of the Cyrillic letters currently in use, plus ones that are no longer used, with their names.

Modern Cyrillic script

Languages written with the Cyrillic alphabet

The Cyrillic alphabet has been adapted to write more than 120 different languages, mainly in Russia, Central Asia and Eastern Europe. In many cases additional letters are used, some of which are adaptations of standard Cyrillic letters, while others are taken from the Greek or Latin alphabets.

Abaza, Abkhaz, Adyghe, Aghul, Akhvakh, Altay, Andi, Archi, Assyrian / Neo-Assyrian, Avar, Azeri, Bagvalal, Balkar, Bashkir, Belarusian, Bezhta, Botlikh, Budukh, Bulgarian, Buryat, Chamalal, Chechen, Chelkan, Chukchi, Chuvash, Crimean Tatar, Dargwa, Dolgan, Dungan, Enets, Erzya, Even, Evenki, Gagauz, Godoberi, Hinukh, Hunzib, Ingush, Interslavic, Itelmen, Kabardian, Khinalug, Juhuri, Kalmyk, Karaim, Karakalpak, Karata, Kazakh, Ket, Khakas, Khanty, Khwarshi, Kildin Sámi, Komi, Koryak, Krymchak, Kryts, Kubachi, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kyrgyz, Lak, Lezgi, Lingua Franca Nova, Macedonian, Mansi, Mari, Moksha, Moldovan, Mongolian, Montenegrin, Nanai, Nenets, Nganasan, Nivkh, Nogai, Old Church Slavonic, Oroch, Orok, Ossetian, Pontic Greek, Russian, Ruthenian, Rutul, Selkup, Serbian, Shor, Shughni, Slovio, Soyot, Tabassaran, Tajik, Talysh, Tat, Tatar, Tindi, Tofa, Tsakhur, Tsez, Turkmen, Tuvan, Ubykh, Udege, Udi, Udmurt, Ukrainian, Ulch, Urum, Uyghur, Uzbek, Votic, Wakhi, West Polesian, Yaghnobi, Yakut, Yazghulami, Yukaghir, Yupik (Central Siberian)

Links

Information about the history of the Cyrillic alphabet
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyrillic_script
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Early_Cyrillic_alphabet
http://www.volgawriter.com/VW%20Cyrillic.htm
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyrillic_alphabets

Free Cyrillic fonts
http://www.wazu.jp/gallery/Fonts_CyrS.html
http://www.fingertipsoft.com/ref/cyrillic/fontlist.html
http://www.typography.com/collections/cyrillic/
http://kodeks.uni-bamberg.de/AKSL/Schrift/RomanCyrillicStd.htm

ALPHABETUM - a Unicode font specifically designed for ancient scripts, including classical & medieval Latin, ancient Greek, Etruscan, Oscan, Umbrian, Faliscan, Messapic, Picene, Iberian, Celtiberian, Gothic, Runic, Old & Middle English, Hebrew, Sanskrit, Old Nordic, Ogham, Kharosthi, Glagolitic, Old Cyrillic, Phoenician, Avestan, Ugaritic, Linear B, Anatolian scripts, Coptic, Cypriot, Brahmi, Old Persian cuneiform: http://guindo.pntic.mec.es/~jmag0042/alphabet.html

Alphabets

Other writing systems


If you need to type in many different languages, the Q International Keyboard can help. It enables you to type almost any language that uses the Latin, Cyrillic or Greek alphabets, and is free.

If you like this site and find it useful, you can support it by making a donation, or by contributing in other ways. Omniglot is how I make my living.

Note: all links on this site to Amazon.com, Amazon.co.uk and Amazon.fr are affiliate links. This means I earn a commission if you click on any of them and buy something. So by clicking on these links you can help to support this site.